Aug. 16 Radio Show

Citizens for Truth about the Kennedy Assassination was organized as a result of the April 1993 Chicago Midwest Symposium on Assassinations. At the end of that conference, it was generally decided that the time had come to create a political action group, which would urge the executive branch of our government to re-open the unsolved assassinations of the 1960s-i.e., the murders of President John F. Kennedy, Senator Robert F. Kennedy, and Dr. Martin Luther King. CTKA endeavors to ensure that the Review Board fulfill its mandate to release all the remaining records pertaining to the JFK assassination; to amend the current Freedom of Information Act to render future covert actions more difficult to hide; and to urge the American people to discover the truth about their history.

Janney needs to have a reason for Meyer to be killed by someone besides Crump. So what did he and Damore dream up as a motive for a precision commando team to do away with the single mom who was trying to be a painter? According to the two sleuths it was this: Mary doubted the Warren Report. (Janney, p. 329) Yep, that’s it. We are supposed to believe that the CIA so feared the single mom’s Vincent Salandria-like forensic skills that they decided to kill her. The problem with this is that there isn’t any credible evidence for it. But that’s no problem for Janney and Damore. They find a way around it. According to Janney, Mary must have read Mark Lane’s critical essay about the Commission in The Guardian in December of 1963. She must have read the New Republic piece called Seeds of Doubt by Staughton Lynd and Jack Miniss also. And, of course, Mary had to have read the article by Harry Truman in the Washington Post, which really is not about Kennedy’s assassination, but about how Truman felt the CIA had strayed from its original mission. I think this is what Janney is saying. Since he spends six otherwise unnecessary pages describing these 3 essays. (pgs. 297-302) The problem is there is no evidence, let alone proof, she did any of this, or was even interested in it. Just as there is no proof that Mary discussed the assassination with William Walton. Even though, if you can believe it, Janney spends five pages on that possibility. (pgs. 302-06) Janney apparently thinks that if he describes something long enough we will be convinced that Mary read it. Not so. For anyone who sees through that tactic, this material is empty filler.

So much of it is simply not credible, and some of it is provably, factually, untrue.

Not all conspiracy theories are equal, and frankly, the more I read, the more I realize how few authors are really careful. But Janney is not just sloppy -- he's manipulative, emotionally, and that makes it harder for people to read it critically when they don't know "the rest of the story."

Just for a sample, Jim DiEugenio asked Joe Trento about the emails quoted in Janney's book. Trento denied writing those, which should surprise no one, because the ones Janney included were "forwarded' from the known forger Gregory Douglas, aka Walter Storch (and aka too many other names to mention, as you'll see in my review.) Obviously, Douglas made them up, and the naive Janney believed them and included them to make his point. Trento has been 100% consistent in saying Douglas never was given any of Crowley's files, which makes perfect sense if you understand how the CIA works.

Citizens for Truth about the Kennedy Assassination, Review of Peter Janney’s Mary’s Mosaic, Part One by Lisa Pease, June 2012. Peter Janney wrote a book entitled Mary’s Mosaic: The CIA Conspiracy to Murder John F. Kennedy, Mary Pinchot Meyer, and their Vision for World Peace. From the subtitle, researchers can be forgiven for thinking that Janney’s book is a serious contribution to our side, as many of us believe that the CIA killed John Kennedy in part because he was trying to end the Cold War and rein in covert operations. But Janney’s book is such a frustrating mix of fact, fiction, speculation and unverifiable data that I cannot recommend this book. Indeed, I’d rather it came with a warning label attached.

So I’ll focus on challenging some specifics regarding the three key points of Janney’s overall thesis, which are: 1) that Mary Meyer was not killed by Ray Crump, the man arrested and tried but not convicted of her murder; 2) that Meyer had an ongoing, serious sexual relationship with a President Kennedy that involved drug use; and 3) that Meyer’s investigation into the CIA’s role in the JFK assassination got her killed. Janney believes these three conclusions to be true. After reading his presentation, and doing a little additional research of my own, I’m convinced that none of these are true.

Citizens for Truth about the Kennedy Assassination, Review of Peter Janney’s Mary’s Mosaic, Part Two by James DiEugenio, July 2012.The reader is familiar with the old saying that extraordinary claims demand extraordinary evidence. If not, they are reduced to empty bombast. This book is filled with claims and revisionism that are so extraordinary that they are startling. The problem is that there is a paucity of evidence for them that is simply appalling. It is so appalling that, for the experienced and knowledgeable reader, one has to wonder why Janney wrote the book. After reading it, and taking 15 pages of notes, I think I figured it out....For the aggrandizement of Mary Meyer in this book is both unprecedented and stupefying. If Janney could back it up with credible evidence, it would be one thing. He doesn’t. Therefore it gets to be offensive since it says more about Janney’s childhood wish fulfillment than it does about Mary Meyer. But there is something even worse at work here. Since Mary Meyer is to be the exalted center of the book’s universe, this means that all the other personages rotating around her will be defined by Janney’s blinding portrait of Mary.

Peter Janney wrote a book entitled Mary’s Mosaic: The CIA Conspiracy to Murder John F. Kennedy, Mary Pinchot Meyer, and their Vision for World Peace. From the subtitle, researchers can be forgiven for thinking that Janney’s book is a serious contribution to our side, as many of us believe that the CIA killed John Kennedy in part because he was trying to end the Cold War and rein in covert operations. But Janney’s book is such a frustrating mix of fact, fiction, speculation and unverifiable data that I cannot recommend this book. Indeed, I’d rather it came with a warning label attached. Most people don’t read books the way I do. Most people assume the data presented is true unless proven false, and they give the author the benefit of the doubt. On any topic of controversy, especially the JFK assassination, which has become so imbued with disinformation that it’s hard to know whom to believe, I take the opposite approach. I pretty much dare the author to prove his case to me, and I check every fact I don’t already know from elsewhere against the author’s sources to determine whether or not I find his “facts,” and therefore his thesis, credible.


http://www.opednews.com/articles/Turn-out-the-lights-the-p-by-Michael-Collins-120821-495.html

http://www.ctka.net/whoweare.html

Citizens for Truth about the Kennedy Assassination was organized as a result of the April 1993 Chicago Midwest Symposium on Assassinations. At the end of that conference, it was generally decided that the time had come to create a political action group, which would urge the executive branch of our government to re-open the unsolved assassinations of the 1960s-i.e., the murders of President John F. Kennedy, Senator Robert F. Kennedy, and Dr. Martin Luther King. CTKA endeavors to ensure that the Review Board fulfill its mandate to release all the remaining records pertaining to the JFK assassination; to amend the current Freedom of Information Act to render future covert actions more difficult to hide; and to urge the American people to discover the truth about their history.


Janney needs to have a reason for Meyer to be killed by someone besides Crump. So what did he and Damore dream up as a motive for a precision commando team to do away with the single mom who was trying to be a painter? According to the two sleuths it was this: Mary doubted the Warren Report. (Janney, p. 329) Yep, that’s it. We are supposed to believe that the CIA so feared the single mom’s Vincent Salandria-like forensic skills that they decided to kill her. The problem with this is that there isn’t any credible evidence for it. But that’s no problem for Janney and Damore. They find a way around it. According to Janney, Mary must have read Mark Lane’s critical essay about the Commission in The Guardian in December of 1963. She must have read the New Republic piece called Seeds of Doubt by Staughton Lynd and Jack Miniss also. And, of course, Mary had to have read the article by Harry Truman in the Washington Post, which really is not about Kennedy’s assassination, but about how Truman felt the CIA had strayed from its original mission. I think this is what Janney is saying. Since he spends six otherwise unnecessary pages describing these 3 essays. (pgs. 297-302) The problem is there is no evidence, let alone proof, she did any of this, or was even interested in it. Just as there is no proof that Mary discussed the assassination with William Walton. Even though, if you can believe it, Janney spends five pages on that possibility. (pgs. 302-06) Janney apparently thinks that if he describes something long enough we will be convinced that Mary read it. Not so. For anyone who sees through that tactic, this material is empty filler.

Review of Peter Janney’s Mary’s Mosaic

Part One by Lisa Pease
Part Two by James DiEugenio


ttp://www.ctka.net/reviews/Pease_Janney_Mary's_Mosaic.html

http://www.ctka.net/reviews/DiEugenio_Janney_Mary's_Mosaic.html



I assume you really are interested in justice and integrity from the name of your site. But I fear you need to rethink your belief in Janney's work. Please see my and Jim DiEugenio's reviews of this book. So much of it is simply not credible, and some of it is provably, factually, untrue.

Not all conspiracy theories are equal, and frankly, the more I read, the more I realize how few authors are really careful. But Janney is not just sloppy -- he's manipulative, emotionally, and that makes it harder for people to read it critically when they don't know "the rest of the story."

Just for a sample, Jim DiEugenio asked Joe Trento about the emails quoted in Janney's book. Trento denied writing those, which should surprise no one, because the ones Janney included were "forwarded' from the known forger Gregory Douglas, aka Walter Storch (and aka too many other names to mention, as you'll see in my review.) Obviously, Douglas made them up, and the naive Janney believed them and included them to make his point. Trento has been 100% consistent in saying Douglas never was given any of Crowley's files, which makes perfect sense if you understand how the CIA works.

My review here: http://www.ctka.net/reviews/Pease_Janney_Mary's_Mosaic.html

Jim's review here: http://www.ctka.net/reviews/DiEugenio_Janney_Mary's_Mosaic.html

Just because someone said the CIA killed Kennedy doesn't mean they're telling the truth. All the best research points in that direction. But don't think the CIA doesn't have its people out muddying the waters, laying traps for people like Janney and others to fall into.

 

Part Two by James DiEugenio


Peter Janney wrote a book entitled Mary’s Mosaic: The CIA Conspiracy to Murder John F. Kennedy, Mary Pinchot Meyer, and their Vision for World Peace. From the subtitle, researchers can be forgiven for thinking that Janney’s book is a serious contribution to our side, as many of us believe that the CIA killed John Kennedy in part because he was trying to end the Cold War and rein in covert operations. But Janney’s book is such a frustrating mix of fact, fiction, speculation and unverifiable data that I cannot recommend this book. Indeed, I’d rather it came with a warning label attached.

Most people don’t read books the way I do. Most people assume the data presented is true unless proven false, and they give the author the benefit of the doubt. On any topic of controversy, especially the JFK assassination, which has become so imbued with disinformation that it’s hard to know whom to believe, I take the opposite approach. I pretty much dare the author to prove his case to me, and I check every fact I don’t already know from elsewhere against the author’s sources to determine whether or not I find his “facts,” and therefore his thesis, credible.

http://www.ctka.net/reviews/Pease_Janney_Mary's_Mosaic.html

http://www.ctka.net/reviews/DiEugenio_Janney_Mary's_Mosaic.html

, mostly ignored by the mainstream media, alleging government involvement with
The answer? According to investigative reporter and author Wayne Madsen, a former Navy Intelligence officer, the answer is that the CIA and its allies want Fuller protected  /images/biz/don_siegelman_dana-baby.jpg

Don and Dana Siegelman

 

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will be my guest July 26 at noon (EDT) on this week's edition of MTL Washington Update, the weekly public affairs show I co-host with show founder and producer Scott Dhttp://justice-integrity.org/plugins/editors/jce/tiny_mce/plugins/readmore/img/trans.gifraughon. Click here to listen to the live interview. Your comments or questions are welcome: Call (866) 685-7469 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


The country’s most notorious federal judge Aug. 3 sentenced former Alabama Gov. Don Siegelman to 78 months more in prison on trumped-up corruption convictions. The proceedings cement into history a national disgrace for the justice system. The infamy is parallel on the world stage to France's sentence of Capt. Alfred Dreyfus to Devil's Island on phony charges more than a century ago. Don Siegelman Family

U.S. District Judge Mark E. Fuller of Montgomery, a longtime Republican partisan, also imposed a $50,000 fine payable immediately by a man who has already spent vast amounts on legal bills to defend himself from a prosecution that cost United States taxpayers an estimated $100 million.

The judge's high-minded rhetoric at sentencing was accompanied by his needless cruelty against his Democratic target. In imposing the fine, the judge clearly sought to hurt Siegelman’s wife and two children, shown at left with the defendant. The judge's financial scorched-earth policy is in the spirit of cultures who celebrate defeats of enemy soldiers by brutalizing surviving family members and burning their village.  

Mark E. FullerFuller, at right, ordered Siegelman, 66, once his state’s most powerful Democrat, also to spend 500 hours of community service upon release. By then, the defendant will be in his seventies, stripped of his license to practice law and with no foreseeable way to generate any income.

Update: Siegelman supporters have launched a petition here at Change.org for a presidential pardon.

Siegelman was prosecuted largely because his political popularity threatened GOP success in transforming Alabama to overwhelmingly Republican state office-holders and policies. Alabama’s Republicans began investigating Siegelman promptly after he became governor in 1999. Bush Republicans joined in the hunt after they took office nationally in 2001.

With the prodding of White House senior advisor Karl Rove, the Bush Justice Department prosecuted prominent Democrats like Siegelman across the United States on flimsy charges. This transformed the nation’s political map by imprisoning Democrats and protecting Republicans where prosecutorial discretion could impact elections. We know about the plan because of the U.S. attorney purge scandal in 2007. The scandal revealed that the Bush DOJ fired nine of the 93 Republicans in powerful regional posts, leaving the most partisan “loyal Bushies” in place in Alabama, as elsewhere.

Not surprisingly, Bush Republicans whitewashed the scandal. The Obama administration and Senate cooperated by declining to call witnesses or otherwise investigate the Bush excesses. Instead, the Obama Justice Department has harshly pursued virtually all victims. One of the few exceptions was Republican Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska, who landed before an honest judge who demanded justice from the Justice Department.

The purpose of my column today is to: 1) Recap Siegelman's Aug. 3 sentencing; and 2) Point to commentary that helps clarify the meaning. The material is in segments, with background at bottom. I'll write a follow-up later explaining reasons why leaders of both parties have long protected the judge and allow similar outrages to continue. That column also will suggest next steps for those who are justifiably astonished, dismayed, fearful, and angry about this scandal's implications for the rest of the country.

The Siegelman prosecution cost federal taxpayers to least $100 million, according to Siegelman adviser Chip Hill. The column and appendices below will show that the cost to the United States reputation for justice is far higher.

Where does Siegelman fit into this picture, and how did he become the target of a bogus prosecution that was driven by the Bush family and their affiliates? Siegelman was our state's attorney general from 1987 to 1991, and WMR reports that he became aware of Fuller's ties to Doss Aviation and the use of south Alabama airfields for suspicious flights to Central and South America. To make Siegelman even more of a target, he and Robert Vance had once been law partners--and Siegelman considered Vance to be one of his primary mentors.

Fuller recently resentenced Siegelman to five years and nine months in federal prison, with a curious reporting date of September 11, 2012. Even more curious, WMR reports, is a statement Fuller made at the resentencing hearing: (WMR is a subscription site, and a link is not available to the content; we have received permission to run excerpts from the piece.)

After Siegelman said he accepted the decision of the court and respected the system, Fuller made a shocking and revealing statement that underscored his own criminal past--and desire for revenge against Siegelman, Alabama’s attorney general two decades ago before he became a one-term governor from 1999 to 2003.

"You came from the highest legal office in the state of Alabama,” Fuller told Siegelman Aug. 3, “and it has taken you 21 years to understand that, and I find that difficult.”

This column reveals for the first time the meaning behind Fuller’s comment, which stems, according to WMR sources, from the Fuller family’s involvement in the notorious Iran-Contra arms and dope-smuggling scandal of the late 1980s.

Iran-Contra has its roots in the Reagan years, and fallout from the scandal continued during the George H.W. Bush administration. Mark Fuller was a private attorney in a small Alabama town at the time, so how did he become involved? WMR explains:

The fear of the Bush administration was that its network of CIA-linked drug and weapons runners would be exposed. Of particular concern to the conspirators was the activities of a group of CIA shell companies, all mostly dealing with millions of dollars of cash transactions, including air transport firms incorporated mostly in the small southeastern Alabama town of Enterprise would be exposed.

From 1985 to 1996, Fuller was a private attorney in Enterprise with the law firm Cassady, Fuller and Marsh. One of Fuller's clients was a company called Parker Brown Refueling Company of Enterprise. In 1989, Parker Brown Refueling Company was bought by investors in Colorado Springs, and the company became known as Doss Aviation. The Brown in Parker Brown Refueling was the mayor of Enterprise, M. M. "Jug" Brown. The Cassady in Cassady, Fuller and Marsh, according to a reliable source in Enterprise, was Joe Cassady, who, according to our source, also served on the board of Doss Aviation.

Fuller's rise in legal and judicial circles was driven, WMR reports, by his ties to Doss Aviation, CIA-backed drug and gun smuggling, and the Bush family:


WMR has learned that Siegelman, as Attorney General, was well-aware of Doss Aviation's dealings and Fuller's role in the firm. In 1996, Republican Governor Fob James had Fuller appointed as the Chief Assistant District Attorney for the 12th Judicial Circuit of Alabama and later that year he was elected District Attorney for the 12th Circuit. In 2002, President George W. Bush nominated Fuller as a federal judge for the Middle District of Alabama in Montgomery.

In the span of six years, Fuller went from a largely unknown small-town lawyer, with thin credentials, to a federal judge. A specific and sinister purpose was behind Fuller's rapid ascent:


As district attorney and federal judge, Fuller has been entrusted by the CIA to ensure that the illegal operations involving the agency's drug and weapons smuggling operations remain a secret. In addition, Fuller has ensured that anyone who is believed to be a threat to the secrecy of the operation, is dealt with harshly, and that includes the Attorney General who first caught wind of the Enterprise operation, Siegelman.

How does this tie back to the Robert Vance assassination? Walter Leroy Moody was convicted in 1991 of being the sole individual responsible for sending the mail bomb, but WMR reports that Moody almost certainly did not act alone--if he was involved at all. The Vance murder probably was tied to Avirgan v. Hull, a lawsuit that grew from the 1984 bombing at a contra press conference in La Penca, Costa Rica, killing one American journalist (Linda Frazier) and injuring another (Tony Avirgan). The Miami-based Christic Institute brought the case under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO), alleging that a North American farmer named John Hull was behind the bombing. A 1990 report from the Christic Institute provides background:


Among those injured was ABC cameraman Tony Avirgan. Once Avirgan recovered from his injuries he joined his wife, journalist Martha Honey, who had already begun an investigation to track down those responsible for the La Penca bombing.

The two journalists discovered a trail of evidence leading from La Penca to a secret contra base in Costa Rica, located on a ranch owned by a North American farmer named John Hull. Eyewitnesses identified the ranch as the staging area for the La Penca bombing. 

Avirgan and Honey learned that Hull was a key figure in the criminal enterprise of retired military officers, former intelligence officials and private "soldiers of fortune" who were supplying arms for the contra war against Nicaragua. They also learned that Hull was allowing Colombian drug traffickers to use his ranch to smuggle cocaine into the United States. The profits from the drug operation were used to purchase military supplies for the contras.

Despite an escalating series of anonymous death threats and the murder on Hull's ranch of one of their informants, Avirgan and Honey completed their investigation and published their findings. Realizing they had found evidence of a broad criminal conspiracy, the two journalists asked the Christic Institute to represent them in a federal civil lawsuit against the individuals responsible for the La Penca bombing and other criminal acts. The Christic Institute, which had already amassed extensive information about the criminal operations of the Richard Secord Enterprise, agreed to represent the journalists.

The lawsuit was filed six months before the Iran-Contra story broke in the press. A federal judge in Miami dismissed the lawsuit, but a number of reports have stated that Vance was considered a strong bet to reinstate the case on appeal in the Eleventh Circuit. The appeal was pending when a mail bomb exploded at Vance's Mountain Brook home on December 12, 1989, killing him instantly. Christic's appeal would be denied, and the trial judge's imposition of Rule 11 sanctions totaling about $1.5 million was upheld, forcing the institute into bankruptcy. That helped ensure that the truth behind Iran-Contra would never be unraveled, and WMR shows how it all ties to the Siegelman prosecution:


The murder of Vance needs to be understood in the context of the 1980s Iran-Contra scandal and Siegelman’s understandable desire to investigate it as attorney general, particularly given the extensive use of airfields in Southern Alabama for suspicious flights to Central and South America. Vance was the lead justice on the 11th Circuit panel that was considering the appeal of a lower court's decision to toss out a Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organizations (RICO) suit brought by the Christic Institute against the Bush administration for the Iran-contra scandal, specifically the 1984 bombing of a contra meeting in La Penca, Costa Rica that killed American journalist Linda Frazier and injured another American journalist, Tony Avirgan. The suit was thrown out by U.S. Judge James King in Miami and an appeal was filed by Christic with the 11th Circuit in Atlanta. With Vance's assassination, the RICO appeal was doomed. Siegelman, as someone close to Vance and, hence, to the case, would have understood the impact of Vance's assassination in exposing the entire Iran-contra episode, including Fuller's involvement with it.

According to WMR, Fuller knows exactly who helped him rise to power, and he intends to protect their secrets at all cost.


As district attorney and federal judge, Fuller has been entrusted by the CIA to ensure that the illegal operations involving the agency's drug and weapons smuggling operations remain a secret. In addition, Fuller has ensured that anyone who is believed to be a threat to the secrecy of the operation, is dealt with harshly and that includes the Attorney General who first caught wind of the Enterprise operation, Siegelman.

Those behind Iran-Contra never have been held fully accountable. But Madsen's report reminds us that a few serious journalists have tried to enlighten the public. The Associated Press' Robert Parry, now at Consortium News, helped break the story in the mid 1980s. Gary Webb, of the San Jose Mercury News, produced a groundbreaking series showing that CIA-backed drug smuggling helped fuel the American crack-cocaine epidemic of the 1980s.

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Contact the author Andrew Kreig or comment
 

 

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Washington Post, Campaign contribution or bribe? Robert Barnes, Aug. 12, 2012. Former Alabama governor Don Siegelman heads back to prison next month, contrite about and embarrassed by his bribery conviction. Siegelman’s long and tangled legal journey — the charges date back to a 1999 state referendum — appears to be over. But the debate over “the line where a campaign contribution becomes a bribe,” especially relevant in a year when campaign spending has become a paramount issue, shows no signs of fading away. Not long before Siegelman learned his fate, a different federal judge who had presided over a different public corruption trial in the same Montgomery courthouse issued his own demarcation plea. “The Supreme Court needs to address this issue and provide guidance to the lower courts, prosecutors, politicians, donors and the general public,” wrote U.S. District Judge Myron H. Thompson, who was appointed to the federal bench in 1980.

SpectrumTalk, 9th Circuit Court of Appeals Hears CTIA vs. SF Cell Phone Disclosure Case: "Must See TV," Michael Marcus, Aug. 13, 2012.  Your blogger surprised the CTIA legal team on Thursday by showing up at the Federal Courthouse in San Francisco to hear the oral arguments before the 9th Circuit of Appeals on the litigation captioned CTIA - The Wireless Association v. The City & County of S.F. as well as a countersuit. (Actually I was in San Francisco on an unrelated technical matter and had free time in the morning and the oral argument seemed the best free show in town.) The case was argued before Judges Schoeder, Callahan, and Korman by CTIA’s Andrew McBride of Wiley Rein and Deputy City Attorney Vince Chhabria represented San Francisco. If you are interested in the pleadings, CTIA has posted one recent pleading. The other side has 2 pleadings available on their website: San Francisco's opening 9th Circuit brief (Jan. 25, 2012);Francisco's opening 9th Circuit brief (April 4, 2012) Complete pleadings of all parties are available on the court’s PACER system but registration is needed and fees must be paid if you download more than 150 pages/quarter. On the eve of the oral arguments, GAO released a new report on the cell phone health issue.

Consortium News, The Warning in Gary Webb’s Death, Robert Parry, December 9, 2011. Special Report: Modern American history is more complete because journalist Gary Webb had the courage to revive the dark story of the Reagan administration’s protection of Nicaraguan Contra cocaine traffickers in the 1980s. However, Webb ultimately paid a terrible price. Every year since investigative journalist Gary Webb took his own life in 2004, I have marked the anniversary of that sad event by recalling the debt that American history owes to Webb for his brave reporting, which revived the Contra-cocaine scandal in 1996 and forced important admissions out of the Central Intelligence Agency two years later. But Webb’s suicide on the evening of Dec. 9, 2004, was also a tragic end for one man whose livelihood and reputation were destroyed by a phalanx of major newspapers – the New York Times, the Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times– serving as protectors of a corrupt power structure rather than as sources of honest information. In reviewing the story again this year, I was struck by how Webb’s Contra-cocaine experience was, in many ways, a precursor to the subsequent tragedy of the Iraq War.

Wayne Madsen Report, Judge Fuller's "smoking gun" statement at Siegelman re-sentencing, Wayne Madsen, Aug. 10, 2012 (Subscription required). Judge Mark E. Fuller opened up a can of worms at hearing and implicated himself in a long-forgotten murder conspiracy.

Catching Our Attention on other Justice, Media & Integrity Issues

Rob KallOpEd News, Do You Think Obama Was the First to Order Assassinations? Rob Kall, August 12, 2012.I viewed the new movie, Bourne Legacy, last night. I think that's what inspired the dream. I think I can say, without being a spoiler, that a lot of people are killed in Bourne Legacy at the behest of the US government. Last night, I kept having this repeating dream that someone had to revise some file on the internet -- an article or something -- then, afterward, would be killed....Finally, I got up out of bed and a thought dawned on me. First, was that this dream was probably primed by the movie. But then, the big realization was that Obama's decision to kill Americans extra-judicially, without justice, without judges or courts, was probably based on precedent. It's just not in Obama's DNA to decide to set a policy that it's okay to kill people. But he went public with that policy. We need to go back in history and draw a line and start asking which presidents exercised this power and who they killed. I have zero doubt that Obama did it first. He did it because he wanted to look tough and maybe because he got caught. But it casts a light into a dark, stygian corner of our decaying republic, that some are under the illusion is a democracy. That dark corner needs a lot more light.

OpEd News, Bill Fisher on No-Fly List Lawsuit, Joan Brunwasser, Aug. 12, 2012. Joan: My guest today is journalist and political blogger, William Fisher. Welcome to OpEdNews, Bill. You wrote an article recently about the No-Fly List. What's new with that? Bill: Last week, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously ruled that the ACLU's lawsuit challenging the U.S. government's secretive No Fly List should go forward. Here's part of the ACLU's press release: "This decision is a true victory for our clients and all Americans," said Nusrat Choudhury, Staff Attorney with the ACLU National Security Project. So now comes the not-so-good news. He explained: "More than two years ago, 15 U.S. citizens and permanent residents, including four military veterans, were denied boarding on planes. None of them know why this happened. And no government authority has ever given them an explanation or a fair chance to clear their names." What does this all mean? And how many people are affected by the No-Fly List altogether? Are we talking about more than a handful? Altogether, there are said to be at least a million names in play....And all these lists have been questioned because of the large numbers of errors -- misidentifications, dead people, and so forth, from which in the past there has been no publicly available information to seek your escape. The government has even continued to be vague about who compiles the lists, who operates the databases, how and when the names are used, etc.


 

 


 

 

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